Frequently Asked Questions
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Human Rights - Frequently Asked Questions
  • Animals & Pets
    • How; How do I; How can; How . . .?
      • Q: When does a tenant with a disability have a right to have a pet?
        • A: You have the right to keep a service animal, if it is required for health reasons, even in a “no pet” community. Animals trained to assist or support those who are blind, deaf, suffer depression, or mobility-impairment can be deemed medically necessary.

  • Assistance
    • How; How do I; How can; How . . .?
      • Q: When are the public accommodations provisions effective?
        • A: In general, they became effective on January 26, 1992.

      • Q: What does the ADA require in new construction?
        • A: The ADA requires that all new construction of places of public accommodation, as well as of "commercial facilities" such as office buildings, be accessible. Elevators are generally not required in facilities under three stories or with fewer than 3,000 square feet per floor, unless the building is a shopping center or mall; the professional office of a health care provider; a terminal, depot, or other public transit station; or an airport passenger terminal.

      • Q: How much does it cost to make all newly constructed places of public accommodation and commercial facilities accessible?
        • A: The cost of incorporating accessibility features in new construction is less than one percent of construction costs. This is a small price in relation to the economic benefits to be derived from full accessibility in the future, such as increased employment and consumer spending and decreased welfare dependency.

      • Q: Would it be necessary to make every feature of a new facility accessible?
        • A: No, only a specified number of elements such as parking spaces and drinking fountains must be made accessible in order for a facility to be "readily accessible." Certain non-occupiable spaces such as elevator pits, elevator penthouses, and piping or equipment catwalks need not be accessible.

      • Q: What are the ADA requirements for altering facilities?
        • A: All alterations that could affect the usability of a facility must be made in an accessible manner to the maximum extent feasible. For example, if during renovations a doorway is being relocated, the new doorway must be wide enough to meet the new construction standard for accessibility. When alterations are made to a primary function area, such as the lobby of a bank or the dining area of a cafeteria, an accessible path of travel to the altered area must also be provided.

      • Q: What kinds of auxiliary aids and services are required by the ADA to ensure effective communication with individuals with hearing or vision impairments?
        • A: Appropriate auxiliary aids and services may include services and devices such as qualified interpreters, assistive listening devices, note takers, and written materials for individuals with hearing impairments; and qualified readers, taped texts, and brailed or large print materials for individuals with vision impairments.

      • Q: When are there limitations on the ADA's auxiliary aids requirements?
        • A: The ADA does not require the provision of any auxiliary aid that would result in an undue burden or in a fundamental alteration in the nature of the goods or services provided by a public accommodation. However, the public accommodation is not relieved from the duty to furnish an alternative auxiliary aid, if available, that would not result in a fundamental alteration or undue burden. Both of these limitations are derived from existing regulations and case law under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and are to be determined on a case-by-case basis.

      • Q: When are restaurants required to have brailed menus?
        • A: Only if waiters or other employees are not made available to read the menu to a blind customer.

      • Q: Will a bookstore be required to maintain a sign language interpreter on its staff in order to communicate with deaf customers?
        • A: No, not if employees communicate by pen and notepad when necessary.

      • Q: What are the limitations, if any on the ADA's barrier removal requirements for existing facilities?
        • A: Barrier removal limitations do exist. Barrier removal need be accomplished only when it is "readily achievable" to do so.

      • Q: What does the term "readily achievable" mean?
        • A: It means "easily accomplishable and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense."

      • Q: What are examples of the types of modifications that would be readily achievable in most cases?
        • A: Examples include the simple ramping of a few steps, the installation of grab bars where only routine reinforcement of the wall is required, the lowering of telephones, and similar modest adjustments.

      • Q: Will businesses need to rearrange furniture and display racks?
        • A: Possibly. For example, restaurants may need to rearrange tables and department stores may need to adjust their layout of racks and shelves in order to permit access to wheelchair users.

      • Q: Will businesses need to install elevators?
        • A: Businesses are not required to retrofit their facilities to install elevators unless such installation is readily achievable, which is unlikely in most cases.

      • Q: When barrier removal is not readily achievable, what kinds of alternative steps are required by the ADA?
        • A: Alternatives may include such measures as in-store assistance for removing articles from inaccessible shelves, home delivery of groceries, or coming to the door to receive or return dry cleaning.

      • Q: What alternative steps must be taken without regard to cost?
        • A: None, only readily achievable alternative steps must be undertaken.

      • Q: How is "readily achievable" determined in a multisite business?
        • A: In determining whether an action to make a public accommodation accessible would be "readily achievable," the overall size of the parent corporation or entity is only one factor to be considered. The ADA also permits consideration of the financial resources of the particular facility or facilities involved and the administrative or fiscal relationship of the facility or facilities to the parent entity.

      • Q: Who has responsibility for ADA compliance in leased places of public accommodation, the landlord or the tenant?
        • A: The ADA places the legal obligation to remove barriers or provide auxiliary aids and services on both the landlord and the tenant. The landlord and the tenant may decide by lease that will actually make the changes and provide the aids and services, but both remain legally responsible.

      • Q: When is a business be entitled to any tax benefit to help pay for the cost of compliance?
        • A: As amended in 1990, the Internal Revenue Code allows a deduction of up to $15,000 per year for expenses associated with the removal of qualified architectural and transportation barriers. The 1990 amendment also permits eligible small businesses to receive a tax credit for certain costs of compliance with the ADA. An eligible small business is one whose gross receipts do not exceed $1,000,000 or whose workforce does not consist of more than 30 full- time workers. Qualifying businesses may claim a credit of up to 50 percent of eligible access expenditures that exceed $250 but do not exceed $10,250. Examples of eligible access expenditures include the necessary and reasonable costs of removing architectural, physical, communications, and transportation barriers; providing readers, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids; and acquiring or modifying equipment or devices.

      • Q: When does the ADA cover private apartments and private homes?
        • A: The ADA does not cover strictly residential private apartments and homes. If, however, a place of public accommodation, such as a doctor's office or day care center, is located in a private residence, those portions of the residence used for that purpose are subject to the ADA's requirements.

      • Q: Who pays to make public and common areas accessible to those with disabilities?
        •  A: Multi-family housing that was first occupied after March 13, 1991, should have been constructed with accessible units, public and common areas. If not, the units and common use areas may have to be changed at no charge to the tenant. For older units, the tenant may have to pay for the changes. Changes to common use areas do not have to be changed back.

      • Q: How can a tenant get a reasonable accommodation – a change in a rule, service, policy or procedure so that disabled tenants may have full use of the property?
        • A: A tenant must ask for a reasonable accommodation. The landlord is not responsible for suggesting an accommodation. A tenant needs to show that the change is needed so that she/he has an equal opportunity to use the dwelling. A tenant may need to have medical or doctor statements to support the request for accommodation.

      • Q: What does the law say about a landlord setting a minimum income level to qualify for a property?
        • A: A landlord may set a minimum income level to quality for a property.  If the landlord sets a minimum standard it should be used for all applicants, not just one group or another.

      • Q: When would it be lawful for a real estate agent to show only certain properties or neighborhoods to potential renters or buyers because of race?
        • A: Never. This action is called “steering”. It is unlawful discrimination for an agent to restrict a client’s housing search to a neighborhood because of race or because of any other protected characteristic.

      • Q: When is it acceptable for a loan officer to offer a lower interest rate on home mortgages to white applicants but not others?
        • A: Financial institutions may evaluate a person’s financial ability to pay back a home loan, but all decisions affecting the loan – including the interest rate, points, and other fees should not be based on race or any other protected characteristic.

      • Q: When can a landlord ask about your disability?
        • A: Never unless you are: - Applying for housing set aside for people with disabilities - Asking for a “reasonable accommodation.” Then a landlord may ask you to show how your disability creates a need for that change.

      • Q: What can a landlord charge you an extra deposit?
        • A:  A landlord can’t charge people with disabilities a higher general deposit. It is discrimination to charge tenants with disabilities more. Even if a landlord worries that a wheelchair may bump into walls or wear out carpet, he cannot make the deposit higher. However, a landlord may be able to charge an extra deposit if a tenant asks for a reasonable modification.

      • Q: How can a tenant get a reasonable accommodation?
        • A: A tenant must ASK for a reasonable accommodation. The landlord is not responsible for suggesting an accommodation. The tenant must show that the change is needed so that she has an equal opportunity to use and enjoy the dwelling. In some cases, a tenant may need to have a doctor or other expert support her request.

      • Q: When does a tenant with a disability have a right to have a pet?
        • A: You have the right to keep a service animal, if it is required for health reasons, even in a “no pet” community. Animals trained to assist or support those who are blind, deaf, suffer depression, or mobility-impairment can be deemed medically necessary.

    • Who; Who do I; Who can; Who . . .?
      • Q: Who is responsible for the cost of “reasonable modifications”?
        • A: Reasonable modifications are changes you make yourself. These changes must be necessary for full enjoyment of the housing. When you leave, you may need to put things back the way they were. To cover the cost of this, the FHA allows a landlord to request an extra deposit: How much depends on what it will cost to put things back. The amount of the deposit must be “reasonable.” The total cannot be more than the cost of restoring the unit. The tenant should be able to pay the extra deposit “over a reasonable period.” Any interest earned on the extra deposit belongs to the tenant. The next tenant may not want the modification changed back. If so, the landlord should return your extra deposit to you when you move. The landlord can then ask the new tenant for an extra deposit. This would pay to put things back the way they were when the new tenant moves. Federal regulations discuss two examples of modifications that might need to be changed back:- Grab bars in the bathroom - The regulations say it is reasonable for a landlord to require the removal of grab bars. Wall reinforcements can be left as they are.- Widening a bathroom doorway - This does not have to be changed back.

  • Health & Human Services
    • How; How do I; How can; How . . .?
      • Q: When are the public accommodations provisions effective?
        • A: In general, they became effective on January 26, 1992.

      • Q: What does the ADA require in new construction?
        • A: The ADA requires that all new construction of places of public accommodation, as well as of "commercial facilities" such as office buildings, be accessible. Elevators are generally not required in facilities under three stories or with fewer than 3,000 square feet per floor, unless the building is a shopping center or mall; the professional office of a health care provider; a terminal, depot, or other public transit station; or an airport passenger terminal.

      • Q: How much does it cost to make all newly constructed places of public accommodation and commercial facilities accessible?
        • A: The cost of incorporating accessibility features in new construction is less than one percent of construction costs. This is a small price in relation to the economic benefits to be derived from full accessibility in the future, such as increased employment and consumer spending and decreased welfare dependency.

      • Q: Would it be necessary to make every feature of a new facility accessible?
        • A: No, only a specified number of elements such as parking spaces and drinking fountains must be made accessible in order for a facility to be "readily accessible." Certain non-occupiable spaces such as elevator pits, elevator penthouses, and piping or equipment catwalks need not be accessible.

      • Q: What are the ADA requirements for altering facilities?
        • A: All alterations that could affect the usability of a facility must be made in an accessible manner to the maximum extent feasible. For example, if during renovations a doorway is being relocated, the new doorway must be wide enough to meet the new construction standard for accessibility. When alterations are made to a primary function area, such as the lobby of a bank or the dining area of a cafeteria, an accessible path of travel to the altered area must also be provided.

      • Q: What kinds of auxiliary aids and services are required by the ADA to ensure effective communication with individuals with hearing or vision impairments?
        • A: Appropriate auxiliary aids and services may include services and devices such as qualified interpreters, assistive listening devices, note takers, and written materials for individuals with hearing impairments; and qualified readers, taped texts, and brailed or large print materials for individuals with vision impairments.

      • Q: When are there limitations on the ADA's auxiliary aids requirements?
        • A: The ADA does not require the provision of any auxiliary aid that would result in an undue burden or in a fundamental alteration in the nature of the goods or services provided by a public accommodation. However, the public accommodation is not relieved from the duty to furnish an alternative auxiliary aid, if available, that would not result in a fundamental alteration or undue burden. Both of these limitations are derived from existing regulations and case law under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and are to be determined on a case-by-case basis.

      • Q: When are restaurants required to have brailed menus?
        • A: Only if waiters or other employees are not made available to read the menu to a blind customer.

      • Q: Will a bookstore be required to maintain a sign language interpreter on its staff in order to communicate with deaf customers?
        • A: No, not if employees communicate by pen and notepad when necessary.

      • Q: What are the limitations, if any on the ADA's barrier removal requirements for existing facilities?
        • A: Barrier removal limitations do exist. Barrier removal need be accomplished only when it is "readily achievable" to do so.

      • Q: What does the term "readily achievable" mean?
        • A: It means "easily accomplishable and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense."

      • Q: What are examples of the types of modifications that would be readily achievable in most cases?
        • A: Examples include the simple ramping of a few steps, the installation of grab bars where only routine reinforcement of the wall is required, the lowering of telephones, and similar modest adjustments.

      • Q: Will businesses need to rearrange furniture and display racks?
        • A: Possibly. For example, restaurants may need to rearrange tables and department stores may need to adjust their layout of racks and shelves in order to permit access to wheelchair users.

      • Q: Will businesses need to install elevators?
        • A: Businesses are not required to retrofit their facilities to install elevators unless such installation is readily achievable, which is unlikely in most cases.

      • Q: When barrier removal is not readily achievable, what kinds of alternative steps are required by the ADA?
        • A: Alternatives may include such measures as in-store assistance for removing articles from inaccessible shelves, home delivery of groceries, or coming to the door to receive or return dry cleaning.

      • Q: What alternative steps must be taken without regard to cost?
        • A: None, only readily achievable alternative steps must be undertaken.

      • Q: How is "readily achievable" determined in a multisite business?
        • A: In determining whether an action to make a public accommodation accessible would be "readily achievable," the overall size of the parent corporation or entity is only one factor to be considered. The ADA also permits consideration of the financial resources of the particular facility or facilities involved and the administrative or fiscal relationship of the facility or facilities to the parent entity.

      • Q: Who has responsibility for ADA compliance in leased places of public accommodation, the landlord or the tenant?
        • A: The ADA places the legal obligation to remove barriers or provide auxiliary aids and services on both the landlord and the tenant. The landlord and the tenant may decide by lease that will actually make the changes and provide the aids and services, but both remain legally responsible.

      • Q: When is a business be entitled to any tax benefit to help pay for the cost of compliance?
        • A: As amended in 1990, the Internal Revenue Code allows a deduction of up to $15,000 per year for expenses associated with the removal of qualified architectural and transportation barriers. The 1990 amendment also permits eligible small businesses to receive a tax credit for certain costs of compliance with the ADA. An eligible small business is one whose gross receipts do not exceed $1,000,000 or whose workforce does not consist of more than 30 full- time workers. Qualifying businesses may claim a credit of up to 50 percent of eligible access expenditures that exceed $250 but do not exceed $10,250. Examples of eligible access expenditures include the necessary and reasonable costs of removing architectural, physical, communications, and transportation barriers; providing readers, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids; and acquiring or modifying equipment or devices.

      • Q: When does the ADA cover private apartments and private homes?
        • A: The ADA does not cover strictly residential private apartments and homes. If, however, a place of public accommodation, such as a doctor's office or day care center, is located in a private residence, those portions of the residence used for that purpose are subject to the ADA's requirements.

      • Q: Who pays to make public and common areas accessible to those with disabilities?
        •  A: Multi-family housing that was first occupied after March 13, 1991, should have been constructed with accessible units, public and common areas. If not, the units and common use areas may have to be changed at no charge to the tenant. For older units, the tenant may have to pay for the changes. Changes to common use areas do not have to be changed back.

      • Q: How can a tenant get a reasonable accommodation – a change in a rule, service, policy or procedure so that disabled tenants may have full use of the property?
        • A: A tenant must ask for a reasonable accommodation. The landlord is not responsible for suggesting an accommodation. A tenant needs to show that the change is needed so that she/he has an equal opportunity to use the dwelling. A tenant may need to have medical or doctor statements to support the request for accommodation.

      • Q: What does the law say about a landlord setting a minimum income level to qualify for a property?
        • A: A landlord may set a minimum income level to quality for a property.  If the landlord sets a minimum standard it should be used for all applicants, not just one group or another.

      • Q: When would it be lawful for a real estate agent to show only certain properties or neighborhoods to potential renters or buyers because of race?
        • A: Never. This action is called “steering”. It is unlawful discrimination for an agent to restrict a client’s housing search to a neighborhood because of race or because of any other protected characteristic.

      • Q: When is it acceptable for a loan officer to offer a lower interest rate on home mortgages to white applicants but not others?
        • A: Financial institutions may evaluate a person’s financial ability to pay back a home loan, but all decisions affecting the loan – including the interest rate, points, and other fees should not be based on race or any other protected characteristic.

      • Q: When can a landlord ask about your disability?
        • A: Never unless you are: - Applying for housing set aside for people with disabilities - Asking for a “reasonable accommodation.” Then a landlord may ask you to show how your disability creates a need for that change.

      • Q: What can a landlord charge you an extra deposit?
        • A:  A landlord can’t charge people with disabilities a higher general deposit. It is discrimination to charge tenants with disabilities more. Even if a landlord worries that a wheelchair may bump into walls or wear out carpet, he cannot make the deposit higher. However, a landlord may be able to charge an extra deposit if a tenant asks for a reasonable modification.

      • Q: How can a tenant get a reasonable accommodation?
        • A: A tenant must ASK for a reasonable accommodation. The landlord is not responsible for suggesting an accommodation. The tenant must show that the change is needed so that she has an equal opportunity to use and enjoy the dwelling. In some cases, a tenant may need to have a doctor or other expert support her request.

      • Q: When does a tenant with a disability have a right to have a pet?
        • A: You have the right to keep a service animal, if it is required for health reasons, even in a “no pet” community. Animals trained to assist or support those who are blind, deaf, suffer depression, or mobility-impairment can be deemed medically necessary.

    • Who; Who do I; Who can; Who . . .?
      • Q: Who is responsible for the cost of “reasonable modifications”?
        • A: Reasonable modifications are changes you make yourself. These changes must be necessary for full enjoyment of the housing. When you leave, you may need to put things back the way they were. To cover the cost of this, the FHA allows a landlord to request an extra deposit: How much depends on what it will cost to put things back. The amount of the deposit must be “reasonable.” The total cannot be more than the cost of restoring the unit. The tenant should be able to pay the extra deposit “over a reasonable period.” Any interest earned on the extra deposit belongs to the tenant. The next tenant may not want the modification changed back. If so, the landlord should return your extra deposit to you when you move. The landlord can then ask the new tenant for an extra deposit. This would pay to put things back the way they were when the new tenant moves. Federal regulations discuss two examples of modifications that might need to be changed back:- Grab bars in the bathroom - The regulations say it is reasonable for a landlord to require the removal of grab bars. Wall reinforcements can be left as they are.- Widening a bathroom doorway - This does not have to be changed back.

  • Housing
    • How; How do I; How can; How . . .?
      • Q: When can a landlord limit the number of children in an apartment?
        • A: Occupancy standards may establish the number of persons in a unit, but not the age of the occupants. Check with any local occupancy standards that pertain to the number of occupants for rental property. If there are no local ordinances, then the usual guideline is two persons per average-sized bedroom.

      • Q: Why can’t a landlord or newspaper advertise “No Children” or “Prefer Christian”?
        • A: No one may advertise or indicate a preference based on any of the protected characteristics.

      • Q: Who is responsible for the cost of a reasonable modification of the property, making it accessible to tenants with disabilities?
        • A: Modifications or changes to the property may be made by the tenant at the tenant’s cost. Many property owners opt to make the changes themselves because the changes may enhance the property for future occupants. An example would be grab bar installation in the washroom.
           
          : If the landlord wants the property to be returned to its prior condition (for example where a ramp is constructed into the dwelling) the law requires that the property be put back to the way it was prior to the modification. To cover the cost of this, the landlord may require an extra deposit to cover the reasonable costs of restoring the property. The landlord may not charge a higher general deposit to persons with disabilities, but an extra deposit specifically set aside to return the property to its original state may be charged.

      • Q: Who pays to make public and common areas accessible to those with disabilities?
        •  A: Multi-family housing that was first occupied after March 13, 1991, should have been constructed with accessible units, public and common areas. If not, the units and common use areas may have to be changed at no charge to the tenant. For older units, the tenant may have to pay for the changes. Changes to common use areas do not have to be changed back.

      • Q: How can a tenant get a reasonable accommodation – a change in a rule, service, policy or procedure so that disabled tenants may have full use of the property?
        • A: A tenant must ask for a reasonable accommodation. The landlord is not responsible for suggesting an accommodation. A tenant needs to show that the change is needed so that she/he has an equal opportunity to use the dwelling. A tenant may need to have medical or doctor statements to support the request for accommodation.

      • Q: What does the law say about a landlord setting a minimum income level to qualify for a property?
        • A: A landlord may set a minimum income level to quality for a property.  If the landlord sets a minimum standard it should be used for all applicants, not just one group or another.

      • Q: When would it be lawful for a real estate agent to show only certain properties or neighborhoods to potential renters or buyers because of race?
        • A: Never. This action is called “steering”. It is unlawful discrimination for an agent to restrict a client’s housing search to a neighborhood because of race or because of any other protected characteristic.

      • Q: When is it acceptable for a loan officer to offer a lower interest rate on home mortgages to white applicants but not others?
        • A: Financial institutions may evaluate a person’s financial ability to pay back a home loan, but all decisions affecting the loan – including the interest rate, points, and other fees should not be based on race or any other protected characteristic.

      • Q: When can a landlord ask about your disability?
        • A: Never unless you are: - Applying for housing set aside for people with disabilities - Asking for a “reasonable accommodation.” Then a landlord may ask you to show how your disability creates a need for that change.

      • Q: What can a landlord charge you an extra deposit?
        • A:  A landlord can’t charge people with disabilities a higher general deposit. It is discrimination to charge tenants with disabilities more. Even if a landlord worries that a wheelchair may bump into walls or wear out carpet, he cannot make the deposit higher. However, a landlord may be able to charge an extra deposit if a tenant asks for a reasonable modification.

      • Q: How can a tenant get a reasonable accommodation?
        • A: A tenant must ASK for a reasonable accommodation. The landlord is not responsible for suggesting an accommodation. The tenant must show that the change is needed so that she has an equal opportunity to use and enjoy the dwelling. In some cases, a tenant may need to have a doctor or other expert support her request.

      • Q: When does a tenant with a disability have a right to have a pet?
        • A: You have the right to keep a service animal, if it is required for health reasons, even in a “no pet” community. Animals trained to assist or support those who are blind, deaf, suffer depression, or mobility-impairment can be deemed medically necessary.

    • Who; Who do I; Who can; Who . . .?
      • Q: Who is responsible for the cost of “reasonable modifications”?
        • A: Reasonable modifications are changes you make yourself. These changes must be necessary for full enjoyment of the housing. When you leave, you may need to put things back the way they were. To cover the cost of this, the FHA allows a landlord to request an extra deposit: How much depends on what it will cost to put things back. The amount of the deposit must be “reasonable.” The total cannot be more than the cost of restoring the unit. The tenant should be able to pay the extra deposit “over a reasonable period.” Any interest earned on the extra deposit belongs to the tenant. The next tenant may not want the modification changed back. If so, the landlord should return your extra deposit to you when you move. The landlord can then ask the new tenant for an extra deposit. This would pay to put things back the way they were when the new tenant moves. Federal regulations discuss two examples of modifications that might need to be changed back:- Grab bars in the bathroom - The regulations say it is reasonable for a landlord to require the removal of grab bars. Wall reinforcements can be left as they are.- Widening a bathroom doorway - This does not have to be changed back.

  • Legal, Legislative, & Regulatory
    • How; How do I; How can; How . . .?
      • Q: What can the Commission do if I think I have been discriminated against?
        • A:  The Commission acts as a neutral fact finder. Our role under the law is to collect facts about your situation and then decide whether discrimination has occurred. We can help you to prepare and file a complaint against anyone who you believe illegally discriminated against you.

      • Q:  What do I need to file a complaint?
        • A: Try to keep a record of the incident. Document the time, date, location, what happened, and comments that were made. Also try to collect information and documentation, such as witness's names and phone numbers to support your allegations.

      • Q: What happens after I file a complaint?
        • A: The commission will try to negotiate a settlement of your complaint. If it cannot be settled, the Commission will investigate your complaint and if it finds that you were illegally discriminated against it will assist in obtaining a remedy for you.

      • Q: When is it too late to file my complaint?
        • A: You must file your complaint with the Commission no later than 300 days after the illegal discrimination happened.

      • Q: How much will it cost me to file a complaint?
        • A: The commission will investigate your complaint at NO cost to you.

      • Q: When do I need an attorney to file a complaint?
        • A: Never. Our services are an alternative to the court system, and you do not need a lawyer to file a complaint or to participate in the hearing process. Our investigator will assist you throughout all processes.

      • Q: What legal action can an employer or landlord take against me for filing a complaint?
        • A: None.  It is against the law for a respondent to retaliate against you because you filed a charge of discrimination or because you helped in an investigation. You may file a charge of retaliation if you believe the respondent has taken such action against you.

      • Q: What other actions should I remember to take after I file a complaint?
        • A: If you move or change your phone number, you must let the Commission know. If your phone is disconnected, or if you do not have a phone, you must leave an address or number where you can be reached. Your complaint could be dismissed if the Commission is unable to get in touch with you.