• Emerald Ash Borer

    Look here to find information and educational links about emerald ash borer (EAB). Residents are encouraged to learn about the city's plans to treat and remove public ash trees, and also to make early plans for managing ash trees on private property.

    Alerts

    More Info

  • About Emerald Ash Borer

    Look here to find information and educational links about emerald ash borer (EAB). Residents are encouraged to learn about the city's plans to treat and remove public ash trees, and also to make early plans for managing ash trees on private property.

    Alerts

    More Info

  • More About Emerald Ash Borer

    Look here to find information and educational links about emerald ash borer (EAB). Residents are encouraged to learn about the city's plans to treat and remove public ash trees, and also to make early plans for managing ash trees on private property.

    Alerts

    More Info

  • Emerald Ash Borer Information

    Look here to find information and educational links about emerald ash borer (EAB). Residents are encouraged to learn about the city's plans to treat and remove public ash trees, and also to make early plans for managing ash trees on private property.

    Alerts

    More Info

City & WRA Launches $220 Million in Sewer Improvements

 

Sewer projects estimated to provide millions of dollars in construction jobs.

 

The Des Moines Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation Authority (WRA) and the City of Des Moines will continue an extensive rebuild of the city’s sewer system that provides for $220 million in sewer construction between now and 2013. This investment will improve central Iowa water quality and reduce the risk of property damage during high rains. 

 

The sewer improvements will meet or exceed Iowa and Federal environmental requirements to separate and treat sewage and reduce the mixing of storm and sanitary sewage. The City and the WRA have entered into a consent decree with the Iowa Attorney General’s Office to move forward with plans to separate storm and sanitary sewers where possible and to treat combined storm and sanitary flows at a new high flow facility that will be built within the City of Des Moines. Construction of the estimated $50 million high flow facility is expected to provide millions of dollars in construction jobs and give metro Des Moines sewer customers the benefit of a state of the art facility.

 

The combined sewer area of Des Moines is roughly the portion of the city lying east of 42nd Street and west of East 18th Street, south of Euclid Avenue and north of the Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers. The area is designated by the yellow shading on the  map.

 

“Although our current sewer system met state standards when constructed,” said William Stowe, WRA and Des Moines Public Works Director, “It is the WRA and City of Des Moines’ responsibility to comply with new Iowa and Federal mandates to separate and treat sewage in a way the meets or exceeds environmental requirements. We choose to lead statewide efforts to improve water quality, particularly on the Des Moines River. This decision to invest nearly a quarter of a billion dollars will underscore the vitality of area waterways and WRA commitment to environmental leadership. ”
 

The WRA is a consortium of Des Moines Metro area communities, counties and sewer districts that work together for wastewater treatment and cleaner rivers in central Iowa. The WRA treats the wastewater from nearly 500,000 connected customers, commercial facilities and industries at the Wastewater Treatment Facility at 3000 Vandalia Road in Des Moines. At this facility, nearly 25 billion gallons of treated water are discharged into the Des Moines River.


For more information see Engineering, or contact William Stowe, WRA and City of Des Moines Public Works Director.